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For information about Camping at Cache Creek visit the Camping page


Cache Creek Canyon Regional Park is located approximately 6 miles north of the town of Rumsey, CA along State Highway 16. The Park is divided into three use areas, the Cache Creek Upper Park Site, the Cache Creek Middle Campground Park Site, and the Cache Creek Lower Park Site. The regional park is located in the beautiful Cache Creek Canyon area, with peaks higher than 2200 feet in elevation and Cache Creek at approximately 500 feet in elevation. The three park use areas offer a range of activities such as white water rafting, rural hiking, kayaking, fishing, and nature walks.

The Regional Park provides over 600 acres of natural wilderness consisting primarily of oak woodlands, pines, grassland meadows with cottonwoods, rushes, sedges and similar riparian habitat at the creek edges. The park also provides rural access to over 54,000 acres of adjacent Federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) property, including the Blue Ridge Trail. The BLM property is within the federally designated, Cache Creek Natural Area.

Cache Creek was named by early French-Canadian trappers and the water in the creek originates from Clear Lake in adjacent Lake County.

CACHE CREEK UPPER DAY USE PARK SITE:Upper Site

This park occupies the most north westerly corner of Yolo County along Cache Creek at the western edge of the Cache Creek Canyon area. The upper park site has a large parking area (use fee required), educational environmental kiosk panels, a restroom and rural access to Cache Creek and the native riparian habitat. This site is popular for rafting vendors during the summer and may be in heavy use during the morning hours on weekends. Potable water is NOT available and cellular phones typically do not work within the canyon parks. Please plan your visit carefully and enjoy the rural beauty of the area safely.
• Parking area (day use fee required)

• Restroom

• Environmental educational panels

• Rural access to Cache Creek


CACHE CREEK LOWER DAY USE SITE:

From the town of Rumsey, the Cache Creek Lower Day Use park site is the first Canyon Park visible along State Highway 16. The lower park site has a large parking area (use fee required), educational environmental kiosk panels, a restroom and rural access to Cache Creek and the native riparian habitat. This site is popular for rafting vendors during the summer and may be in heavy use at all times during the weekends. Rural hiking to Frog Pond trail (5 mile loop), the Blue Ridge trail and over 54,000 acres of Bureau of Land management lands and trails. The trails are accessible by hiking along the rural adjacent County Road 40 which starts at the lower site entry. County Road 40 is closed to vehicles but is available for hikers, horseback, and bicycles. Potable water is NOT available and cellular phones typically do not work within the canyon parks. Please plan your visit carefully and enjoy the rural beauty of the area safely.

• Parking area (day use fee required)

• Restroom

• Environmental educational panels

• Rural access to Cache Creek

• Rural Hiking Access to Frog Pond Trail and the Blue Ridge Trail as well as over 54,000 acres of Bureau of Land Management land


CACHE CREEK RAFTING:

There are several rafting vendors that hold permits with Yolo County for providing rafting services during the summer along Cache Creek. Arrangements for rafting trips and rentals are NOT handled by Yolo County. If you are interested in rafting along Cache Creek you may contact one of the following providers listed in no particular order;

Beth kayaking catching airCache Canyon River Trips, 1-800-796-3091 or link to their website here.

Rubicon Adventures, 1-707-367-3299 or link to their website here.

Adventures Rolling Cross Country, 1-415-332-5075 or link to their website here.

Cache Creek contains Class II and Class III rapids and is not advisable for beginners unless using an experienced rafting service. Temperatures in the Cache Creek Canyon area can reach over 100 degrees Fahrenheit in the summer and the creek water is mostly inaccessible from State Highway 16 due to the steep canyon walls. Please plan your rafting trip carefully and enjoy the beauty of the creek safely.


CACHE CREEK HIKING:

1The Frog Pond trail is a 5 mile loop trail that starts at Cache Creek Lower Day Use Park. This hike is a gradual climb with a few steep parts and ideal for beginners or intermediate hikers. Day Use parking is available (day use fee required) at the Cache Creek Lower Day Use Park Site. Start the trail by hiking down adjacant rural County Road 40 down towards Cache Creek. Cross over the creek and travel along rural County Road 40 until you see the sign for Frog Pond. Follow the trail/road pass the gate near the Frog Pond trail marker all the way to Frog Pond. The trail is very rural and is maintained infrequently, mostly by volunteer efforts. The trail splits at several points, but they all lead to Frog Pond. Trail right will take you towards the high cliff edges that frame Cache Creek on its south side offering views of the entire campground area. The trail also passes through Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land. The trail leads you to a spring fed mountain pond, filled with thousands of frogs.


 3Blue Ridge Trail

The Blue Ridge Trail is an 8 mile loop trail with a very steep climb and spectacular views at the top of Fiske Peak. This hike is ideal for hikers looking for a more challenging hike as this trail gains about 2100 feet in elevation from the start of the trail head. The trail begins within the boundaries of the Cache Creek Regional Park but is mostly within the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands. Day Use parking is available (day use fee required) at the Cache creek Lower Day Use Park Site. Start the trail by hiking down adjacant rural County Road 40 down towards Cache Creek. Cross over the creek and travel along rural County Road 40 and then take the rural road with a yellow gate to your left shortly after crossing over the creek. Keep walking along the rural road along and continue on to a clearing and a small Blue Ridge Trail marker will be on your right which is the beginning of the trail.

General Trail information

Both Frog Pond and Blue Ridge Trails are rural in nature and therefore do not have any access to potable water, restrooms or emergency contact. Cellular phones typically do not operate in the canyon. Typically the nearest location for phone service is near the town of Rumsey. When the campground is open, the Park Host has the ability to contact the sheriff’s department in an emergency, but the campground is typically closed in late fall through early spring. This area of Cache Creek Canyon can reach temperatures over 100 degrees Fahrenheit and well below freezing, even in spring. County Road 40, at the low water bridge crossing at Cache Creek is condemned to vehicular traffic. Access across the bridge is available to pedestrians, bicycles, ATV’s, and horseback visitors. Please plan your hiking trip carefully and enjoy the beauty of the wilderness safely.

For more information on local hiking opportunities contact Yolo Hiker a project of the non-profit group, Tuleyome.


WILD AND SCENIC RIVER:
In 2005 the California state legislature designated Cache Creek as a Wild and Scenic River, which protects the river from future development that might inhibit the free flow of the river. To learn more about the Wild and Scenic designation click here. (Public Resources Code Section 5093.50 – 5093.70)

See Fee Schedule for current rates. The park host is unable to make change.

For more information please contact us via email.

 

Return to full list >>

For information about Camping at Cache Creek visit the Camping page


Cache Creek Canyon Regional Park is located approximately 6 miles north of the town of Rumsey, CA along State Highway 16. The Park is divided into three use areas, the Cache Creek Upper Park Site, the Cache Creek Middle Campground Park Site, and the Cache Creek Lower Park Site. The regional park is located in the beautiful Cache Creek Canyon area, with peaks higher than 2200 feet in elevation and Cache Creek at approximately 500 feet in elevation. The three park use areas offer a range of activities such as white water rafting, rural hiking, kayaking, fishing, and nature walks.

The Regional Park provides over 600 acres of natural wilderness consisting primarily of oak woodlands, pines, grassland meadows with cottonwoods, rushes, sedges and similar riparian habitat at the creek edges. The park also provides rural access to over 54,000 acres of adjacent Federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) property, including the Blue Ridge Trail. The BLM property is within the federally designated, Cache Creek Natural Area.

Cache Creek was named by early French-Canadian trappers and the water in the creek originates from Clear Lake in adjacent Lake County.

CACHE CREEK UPPER DAY USE PARK SITE:Upper Site

This park occupies the most north westerly corner of Yolo County along Cache Creek at the western edge of the Cache Creek Canyon area. The upper park site has a large parking area (use fee required), educational environmental kiosk panels, a restroom and rural access to Cache Creek and the native riparian habitat. This site is popular for rafting vendors during the summer and may be in heavy use during the morning hours on weekends. Potable water is NOT available and cellular phones typically do not work within the canyon parks. Please plan your visit carefully and enjoy the rural beauty of the area safely.
• Parking area (day use fee required)

• Restroom

• Environmental educational panels

• Rural access to Cache Creek


CACHE CREEK LOWER DAY USE SITE:

From the town of Rumsey, the Cache Creek Lower Day Use park site is the first Canyon Park visible along State Highway 16. The lower park site has a large parking area (use fee required), educational environmental kiosk panels, a restroom and rural access to Cache Creek and the native riparian habitat. This site is popular for rafting vendors during the summer and may be in heavy use at all times during the weekends. Rural hiking to Frog Pond trail (5 mile loop), the Blue Ridge trail and over 54,000 acres of Bureau of Land management lands and trails. The trails are accessible by hiking along the rural adjacent County Road 40 which starts at the lower site entry. County Road 40 is closed to vehicles but is available for hikers, horseback, and bicycles. Potable water is NOT available and cellular phones typically do not work within the canyon parks. Please plan your visit carefully and enjoy the rural beauty of the area safely.

• Parking area (day use fee required)

• Restroom

• Environmental educational panels

• Rural access to Cache Creek

• Rural Hiking Access to Frog Pond Trail and the Blue Ridge Trail as well as over 54,000 acres of Bureau of Land Management land


CACHE CREEK RAFTING:

There are several rafting vendors that hold permits with Yolo County for providing rafting services during the summer along Cache Creek. Arrangements for rafting trips and rentals are NOT handled by Yolo County. If you are interested in rafting along Cache Creek you may contact one of the following providers listed in no particular order;

Beth kayaking catching airCache Canyon River Trips, 1-800-796-3091 or link to their website here.

Rubicon Adventures, 1-707-367-3299 or link to their website here.

Adventures Rolling Cross Country, 1-415-332-5075 or link to their website here.

Cache Creek contains Class II and Class III rapids and is not advisable for beginners unless using an experienced rafting service. Temperatures in the Cache Creek Canyon area can reach over 100 degrees Fahrenheit in the summer and the creek water is mostly inaccessible from State Highway 16 due to the steep canyon walls. Please plan your rafting trip carefully and enjoy the beauty of the creek safely.


CACHE CREEK HIKING:

1The Frog Pond trail is a 5 mile loop trail that starts at Cache Creek Lower Day Use Park. This hike is a gradual climb with a few steep parts and ideal for beginners or intermediate hikers. Day Use parking is available (day use fee required) at the Cache Creek Lower Day Use Park Site. Start the trail by hiking down adjacant rural County Road 40 down towards Cache Creek. Cross over the creek and travel along rural County Road 40 until you see the sign for Frog Pond. Follow the trail/road pass the gate near the Frog Pond trail marker all the way to Frog Pond. The trail is very rural and is maintained infrequently, mostly by volunteer efforts. The trail splits at several points, but they all lead to Frog Pond. Trail right will take you towards the high cliff edges that frame Cache Creek on its south side offering views of the entire campground area. The trail also passes through Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land. The trail leads you to a spring fed mountain pond, filled with thousands of frogs.


 3Blue Ridge Trail

The Blue Ridge Trail is an 8 mile loop trail with a very steep climb and spectacular views at the top of Fiske Peak. This hike is ideal for hikers looking for a more challenging hike as this trail gains about 2100 feet in elevation from the start of the trail head. The trail begins within the boundaries of the Cache Creek Regional Park but is mostly within the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands. Day Use parking is available (day use fee required) at the Cache creek Lower Day Use Park Site. Start the trail by hiking down adjacant rural County Road 40 down towards Cache Creek. Cross over the creek and travel along rural County Road 40 and then take the rural road with a yellow gate to your left shortly after crossing over the creek. Keep walking along the rural road along and continue on to a clearing and a small Blue Ridge Trail marker will be on your right which is the beginning of the trail.

General Trail information

Both Frog Pond and Blue Ridge Trails are rural in nature and therefore do not have any access to potable water, restrooms or emergency contact. Cellular phones typically do not operate in the canyon. Typically the nearest location for phone service is near the town of Rumsey. When the campground is open, the Park Host has the ability to contact the sheriff’s department in an emergency, but the campground is typically closed in late fall through early spring. This area of Cache Creek Canyon can reach temperatures over 100 degrees Fahrenheit and well below freezing, even in spring. County Road 40, at the low water bridge crossing at Cache Creek is condemned to vehicular traffic. Access across the bridge is available to pedestrians, bicycles, ATV’s, and horseback visitors. Please plan your hiking trip carefully and enjoy the beauty of the wilderness safely.

For more information on local hiking opportunities contact Yolo Hiker a project of the non-profit group, Tuleyome.


WILD AND SCENIC RIVER:
In 2005 the California state legislature designated Cache Creek as a Wild and Scenic River, which protects the river from future development that might inhibit the free flow of the river. To learn more about the Wild and Scenic designation click here. (Public Resources Code Section 5093.50 – 5093.70)

See Fee Schedule for current rates. The park host is unable to make change.

For more information please contact us via email.

 

Return to full list >>