Rubberized Asphalt Concrete

Rubberized asphalt concrete is a road material made with recycled tires. It is commonly known as "RAC" and has been in use since the late 1970s. RAC is a proven product--one that is cost efficient and an environmentally friendly alternative to traditional road paving.

RAC is cost-effective. A two-inch-thick rubberized asphalt concrete overlay can save as much as $50,000 per lane mile when compared to a four-inch-thick conventional asphalt overlay. RAC is long lasting. It resists cracking and case studies have demonstrated over and over again that RAC, when designed properly, lasts much longer than conventional materials--often 50 percent longer. This saves on maintenance costs.

RAC is durable, safe and quiet. One of the most compelling arguments for using RAC is the potential to quiet our roadways. Research has shown that noise can be reduced as much as 85 percent in some instances. Additionally, RAC provides better traction and visibility in wet weather, which may reduce highway accidents.

RAC is environmentally friendly. A two-inch-thick resurfacing project uses over 2,000 scrap tires per lane mile. This means that for a one-mile section of a four-lane highway, over 8,000 scrap tires can be used in creating a safer, quieter, longer-lasting road! Using RAC can help reduce the number of scrap tires that go into our landfills.

2007 Roadway Rehabilitation Project

The 2007 Roadway Rehabilitation Project rehabilitated approximately 6 centerline miles of Yolo County Roads. The six rehabilitated miles are dispersed throughout the County. CR 85, from 4,530 ft. south of CR 16A to one mile north was widened to a total of 20 ft of Tire Grant Noticeroad surface (2-10 ft. travel lanes) and had its existing failed base ground out and replaced with Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA). This road segment was overlaid with 2 in. of HMA and 2 in. of Rubberized Hot Mix Asphalt Concrete (RHMA). CR 89, from SR-16 to CR 23, had wheel-path rutting repaired through grinding out the existing failed surface pavement and filled with HMA. In addition, CR 89 received a chip seal surface treatment in August 2008 as part of the County’s annual maintenance program. CR 101A, from CR 29 to the City of Davis boundary, had the existing failed base ground out and replaced with HMA and overlaid with 2 in. of RHMA. CR 27, from CR 93 to CR 94, had its existing base stabilized through lime stabilization. This road segment received 2 in. of HMA and 2 in. of RHMA. CR 27, from CR 95 to CR 97, had its existing failed base ground out and replaced with HMA and received a 2 in. RHMA overlay. This project placed approximately 7,250 tons of RHMA and approximately 3,100 tons of HMA. 


CR 22 (Old River Road) Rehabilitation Project

The CR 22 Rehabilitation Project was completed in October 2007. The project began at CR 124 and ended 5,600 ft. south of CR 124. The project involved first surface grinding the existing pavement surface to remove failed pavement areas and to expose failed base areas. The road segment then had its existing failed base ground out and replaced with HMA. Finally, the entire road surface area was overlaid with 2 in. of RHMA. This project placed approximately 2,250 tons of RHMA, resulting in the diversion of 3,954 California automobile tires from landfills.

CR 22 Tire Grant Notice (PDF)

CR 27 (Between CR 93 and CR 94) Reconstruction Project

The CR 27 (Between CR 93 and CR 94) Reconstruction Project was completed in July 2008. The project began at CR 93 and ended at CR 94. The project involved first stabilizing approximately 17 in. of pulverized existing road base and road surface with Portland cement and quicklime.  To the stabilized base 3 in. class II aggregate base and 2 in. of Type A asphalt concrete was added.  The entire road surface was overlaid with 2 in. of RHMA. This project placed approximately 1,508 tons of RHMA resulting in the diversion of 2,650 waste California automobile tires from landfills.

CR 27 (Between CR 95 and CR 97) Rehabilitation Project

The CR 27 (Between CR 95 and CR 97) Rehabilitation Project was completed in July 2008. The project began at CR 95 and ended at CR 97. The project involved first digging out and replacing 6 in. of damaged road surface and base at various locations.  The entire repaired road surface has been overlaid with 2 in. of RHMA. This project placed approximately 2,796 tons of RHMA resulting in the diversion of 4,915 waste California automobile tires from landfills.

CR 85 (Between 750 ft. north of CR 16A to 1.0 Mi. south) Rehabilitation Project

The CR 85 (Between 750 ft. north of CR 16A to 1.0 Mi. south) Rehabilitation Project was completed in July 2008. The project began 750 ft. north of CR 16A and ended 4,530 ft. south of CR 16A. The project involved digging out and replacing 6 in. of damaged road surface and base at various locations.  The road’s width was then increased to 20 ft. by adding approximately 2 ft. of pavement to the road’s west side.  The entire repaired road surface was overlaid with 2 in. of both Type A asphalt concrete and 2 in. RHMA. This project placed approximately 1,295 tons of RHMA resulting in the diversion of 2,276 waste California automobile tires from landfills.

CR 101A (Between CR 29 and Davis City Boundary) Rehabilitation Project

The CR 101A (Between CR 29 and Davis City Boundary) Rehabilitation Project was completed in July 2008. The project began at CR 29 and ended at the Davis City Boundary. The project involved first digging out and replacing 6 in. of damaged road surface and base at various locations.  The entire repaired road surface was overlaid with 2 in. of RHMA. This project placed approximately 1,527 tons of RHMA resulting in the diversion of 2,684 waste California automobile tires from landfills.

CR 27, 85 & 101A Tire Grant Notice (PDF)

 

Free viewers are required for some of the attached documents.
They can be downloaded by clicking on the icons below.